Tagline Bashing Round 3 OR “No, *I* Am The Greatest”

Like Beer? Looking for the best beer? Good news! There are apparently many companies making exactly the product that you’re looking for!


Here’s what they say about themselves:

  • The King of Beers
  • Lager Beer at its Best
  • The Beer so Good it’s Bad
  • The Champagne of Bottled Beers
  • It Doesn’t Get Any Better than This
  • Taste as great as it’s name
  • Probably the best beer in the world
  • The One and Only
  • Reach for Greatness
  • Spot the Difference
  • Miles from Ordinary
  • It’s a bit gorgeous
  • Spot On
  • America’s World Class Beer

Notice a trend? If you want good, great, world class, different, or beautiful beer then we’ve got you covered.


Let’s do a quick reversal on the taglines to see if any of them speak to a specialty rather than an empty boast. (I discussed this strategy in another tagline post a while back.)

  • The Pawn of Beers / The Queen of Beers
  • Lager Beer at its Worst
  • The Beer so Bad it’s Good
  • The Thunderbird of Bottled Beers
  • It Doesn’t Get Any Worse than This
  • Taste as bad as it’s name
  • Probably the Worst beer in the world
  • The Entirely Average
  • Reach for Mediocrity
  • Spot the Sameness
  • Miles from Different
  • It’s a bit ugly
  • Misses the Mark
  • America’s Unremarkable Beer

I’m not seeing anything here that would still appeal to me – meaning that the original taglines are probably viewed as empty boasts.


There are many many many more beer taglines out there – I’ve just chosen a few that focus on quality to prove a point. If you focus on quality in your tagline you’re going to have a very hard time standing out from the competition. Budweiser found a unique way to show quality by associating itself with royalty. They own “King” the way Volvo owns the idea of safe cars. People may try to copy the strategy, but they’ll inevitably get knocked back to some other message.


Here’s the list of brand names and taglines combined – How many did you get right?

  • The King of Beers – Budweiser
  • Lager Beer at its Best – Heineken
  • The Beer so Good it’s Bad – Bad Frog
  • The Champagne of Bottled Beers – Miller
  • It Doesn’t Get Any Better than This – Old Milwaukee
  • Taste as great as it’s name – Old Milwaukee
  • Probably the best beer in the world – Carlsberg
  • The One and Only – Newcastle Brown
  • Reach for Greatness – Bass
  • Spot the Difference – Sagres (Portugal)
  • Miles from Ordinary – Corona (Mexico)
  • It’s a bit gorgeous – Boddingtons
  • Spot On – Carling
  • America’s World Class Beer – Samuel Adams

I can proudly claim Bud, Miller, and almost Old Milwaukee (I thought it was Milwaukee’s Best.) Note that Bud and Miller at least tried to claim quality in a way that wasn’t ordinary – establishing rank or associating it with another product. Most of the rest make the empty and completely subjective claim of greatness without giving you any real identity to latch on to.


Today’s lesson in a nutshell: If you’re not Tony the Tiger or the the fighter Ali, then discussing the greatness of your product is likely to get you nowhere. Find a new way to show why you’re worth a try.


Tate Linden
Principal Consultant
Stokefire Consulting Group
703-778-9925

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